The Arctic is already suffering the effects of a dangerous climate change
Two decades after the United Nations established the Framework Convention on Climate Change in order to "prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system," the Arctic shows the first signs of a dangerous climate change. A team of researchers led by CSIC assures so in an article recently published in Nature Climate Change.

These researchers assert that the Arctic is already suffering some of the effects that, according to The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), correspond with a "dangerous climate change." Currently, the rate of climatic warming exceeds the rate of natural adaptation in arctic ecosystems. Furthermore, the Inuit (Eskimo) population is witnessing how their security, health and traditional cultural activities jeopardize.
 
The experts demand an effort in order to develop indicators that warn about these changes in good time, soften its causes, and re-enact the adaptation and recovery capacity of ecosystems and populations.
 
Carlos Duarte, CSIC researcher and author of the article, states: "We are facing the first clear evidence of a dangerous climate change. However, some of the researchers and some of the media are plunged into a semantic debate about whether the Arctic Sea-Ice has reached a tipping point or not. This all is distracting the attention on the need to develop indicators that warn about the proximity of abrupt changes in the future, as well as on the policymaking to prevent them."

 

Two decades after the United Nations established the Framework Convention on Climate Change in order to “prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system,” the Arctic shows the first signs of a dangerous climate change. (Credit: Image courtesy of CSIC, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas)

 Tipping points are defined as critical points within a system, of which future condition may be qualitatively affected by small perturbations. On the other hand, tipping elements are defined as those components of the Earth system that may show tipping signs. According to the experts, the Arctic shows the largest concentration of potential tipping elements in Earth's Climate System: Arctic Sea-Ice; Greenland Ice-Sheet; North Atlantic deep water formation regions; boreal forests; plankton communities; permafrost; and marine methane hydrates among others.
 
Duarte maintains: "Due to all of this, the Arctic region is particularly prone to show abrupt changes and transfer them to the Global Earth System. It is necessary to find rapid alarm signs, which warn us about the proximity of tipping points, for the development and deployment of adaptive strategies. This all would help to adopt more preventive policies."
 
Effects on the Global Climate System

In another article, published in the latest number of AMBIO, Duarte and other CSIC researchers detail the tipping elements present in the Arctic. They also provide evidence to prove that many of these tipping elements have already entered into a dynamic of change that may become abrupt in most of the cases. According to the study, it is possible to observe numerous tipping elements that would impact on the Global Climate System if they were perturbed.
 
CSIC scientist explains: "In this work, we provide evidence showing that many of these tipping elements have already started up. We also identify which are the climate change thresholds that may accelerate the global climate change. The very human reaction to climate change in the Arctic (dominated by the increase of activities such as transportation, shipping, and resource exploitation) may contribute to accelerate the changes already happening."
 
Scientists believe that nearly 40% of anthropogenic methane emissions could be lessen to a zero cost or even produce a net economic benefit. The experts assert: "In the large term, cutting the accumulative carbon dioxide emissions is essential to downshift the tipping elements such as the Greenland Ice-Sheet." Both articles were written under the European funded project "Arctic Tipping Points."

Source: Science Daily

Trang trước Trang chủ In ấn
Các bài viết khác ...
» Let’s share knowledge and experience to contribute to disaster risk reduction for the suffered communities! (10-16-2015)
» Let’s share knowledge and experience to contribute to disaster risk reduction for the suffering communities! (10-16-2015)
» A study tour on climate change adaptation models in central Vietnam (06-29-2015)
» Viet Nam needs reform mobility policy to increase climate change resilience, UN (10-21-2014)
» Climate change and air pollution will combine to curb food supplies (08-14-2014)
» NGO role in climate change fight strengthened (02-26-2014)
» Celebrating Tanzania’s Forests On World Environment Day (12-23-2013)
» VN seeks a greener path in face of floods (10-28-2013)
» Coastal flood damage could soar to $1tn a year by 2050 (08-22-2013)
» Adaptability in Agriculture and Forestry Activities in Huong Son Commune, Nam Dong district, Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam (06-14-2013)
» Model photos of project CBA/VN/SPA/09/004 (01-04-2013)
» Photos of model on rehabilitation of local salt tolerant rice variety (05-10-2012)
» Dialogue on climate change and aquaculture cultivation (04-23-2012)
» Human Influence On the 21st Century Climate: One Possible Future for the Atmosphere (03-12-2012)
» Direct air capture of CO2 to fight global warming is too expensive to be feasible (02-13-2012)
» Rehabilatation of Local Salt Tolerant Rice Variety in Huong Phong Commune (01-18-2012)
» Model on alternative raising of shrimp, crab and mullet in Huong Phong Commune, Thua Thien Hue Province (01-13-2012)
» Getting adapted to climate changes: both the state and people take actions (01-04-2012)
» CO2 emissions in Vietnam at alarming rate (01-04-2012)
» Hyperwarming climate could turn Earth's poles green (11-25-2011)
 
 
Tiêu điểm
Hoành Bồ phát triển kinh tế gắn với bảo vệ rừng
Gian nan giữ rừng
Lai Châu: Rừng chè cổ thụ 1.000 năm tuổi 1.500m trên đỉnh Khang Su Văn
Nông nghiệp sinh thái không hóa chất: Vườn là rừng, và rừng cũng là vườn
Triển vọng giống lúa chịu mặn
Phát hiện rạn san hô khổng lồ rộng 56.000 km2 ngoài khơi Brazil
Quảng Trị: Nông dân Triệu Phong thích ứng với mô hình sản xuất nông sản sạch.
Sóc Trăng: Chuyển đổi cơ cấu cây ăn trái thích ứng với biến đổi khí hậu
Tài nguyên rừng quý giá: Bảo vệ Trái Đất và con người
Tây Nguyên sử dụng phần lớn giống mới để trồng tái canh cà phê, thích ứng biến đổi khí hậu
CƠ HỘI
Dự án FLEGT khu vực miền Trung tuyển tư vấn cho lớp tập huấn "Phòng cháy chữa cháy cho các thành viên mạng lưới cộng đồng sống phụ thuộc vào rừng"
Dự án FLEGT – Khu vực miền Trung kêu gọi tư vấn lần 2
Cơ hội làm việc với dự án FLEGT – Khu vực miền Trung
Dự án FLEGT khu vực miền Trung cần tuyển tư vấn
Dự án FLEGT đang tuyển nhóm tư vấn thực hiện hoạt động "Thiết lập mạng lưới cộng đống sống phụ thuộc vào rừng" và "Xây dựng mô hình quản lý rừng cộng đồng"
Dự án FLEGT khu vực miền Trung tuyển chuyên gia tư vấn
Hội thảo CÔNG TÁC GIÁM SÁT ĐẦU TƯ CỘNG ĐỒNG TRONG XÂY DỰNG NÔNG THÔN MỚI
KHỞI ĐỘNG QUỸ SÁNG KIẾN “TRẺ EM VÀ THANH NIÊN VỚI BIẾN ĐỔI KHÍ HẬU” GIAI ĐOẠN 2015 – 2016
Đăng nhập
Tài khoản
Mật khẩu
Tin tổng hợp
Việt Nam mới chiếm 6% thị phần thế giới về gỗ và sản phẩm gỗ
Phát huy hiệu quả dịch vụ môi trường rừng
Đề xuất mức chi trả và xác định số tiền chi trả dịch vụ môi trường rừng
Văn kiện hiệp định VPA/FLEGT
Năm 2020 gỗ Việt Nam có thể được cấp phép FLEGT
Chất dẻo sinh học là cách thức bảo vệ môi trường mới ở Nhật Bản
Việt Nam và Liên minh Châu Âu (EU) hoàn tất đàm phán thoả thuận chống khai thác bất hợp pháp và thúc đẩy thương mại gỗ hợp pháp
Phương pháp phát triển cộng đồng dựa vào nội lực (ABCD)
Newsletter
Email của bạn:
Logo các đối tác
 

CORENARM - Trung tâm Nghiên cứu và Tư vấn Quản lý Tài Nguyên

Địa chỉ: 126/14 Nguyễn Phúc Nguyên, Tp. Huế        ĐT: (84-54) 353 9229/3623600

Email: corenarm@gmail.com  Website: http://corenarm.org.vn/

Số lần truy cập: 1480052
Số người đang online: 3